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Meet the hopeful astronauts vying to be the first WOMAN to walk on the moon

NASA is planning to land the first woman on the moon in a little over three years' time and has whittled down who it will be to just nine candidates. They include a Cambridge graduate, marine veteran who fought in Iraq and Afghanistan and a former University of Bath rugby player who starred in the English Women's Premiership. Here, MailOnline looks at each female astronaut shortlisted for the initial Artemis missions, which will culminate in the first crewed landing on the moon in 2025. Bookmaker William Hill has also provided odds for the contenders, who include (clockwise, from top left) Stephanie Wilson, Kate Rubins, Kayla Barron, Jasmin Moghbeli, Nicole Mann, Jessica Watkins, Anne McClain, Jessica Meir and Christina Koch.

Curiosity rover's biggest achievements so far as it celebrates 10 years on Mars

Curiosity has driven nearly 18 miles (29 kilometres) and ascended 2,050 feet (625 metres) while exploring Gale Crater and the foothills of Mount Sharp within it during its 10 years on Mars. The rover has analysed 41 rock and soil samples, relying on a suite of science instruments to learn what they reveal about Earth's rocky sibling. Such has been its success, what was originally intended to be a two-year mission was later extended indefinitely.

Computer models can explain why we constantly crave more material things even when they don't make us feel more happy, say experts at Princeton University in New Jersey.

The hacker found a flaw in Twitter's software that let them phone numbers and emails associated with the millions of accounts. Twitter announced Friday that it has now patched the vulnerability.

Tonga underwater volcanic eruption blasted 58,000 Olympic swimming pools-worth of water into the stratosphere and could weaken the ozone layer, NASA warns

Tonga's volcanic eruption in January blasted enough water to fill more than 58,000 Olympic-size swimming pools - and could weaken the ozone layer. Scientists who examined the amount of water vapour ejected by the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai volcano describe it as 'unprecedented'. The powerful steam was formed when seawater in the South Pacific came into contact with the lava and was 'superheated'. The eruption created sound waves heard as far as Alaska 6,200 miles away, in a sonic boom that circled the globe twice. In a new study, experts from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory predict the volume of water could be enough to temporarily affect the global average temperature. 'We've never seen anything like it,' said atmospheric scientist Dr Luis Millán.

In a milestone moment for South Korea, the Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter lifted off from Florida's Cape Canaveral US Space Force Station at 19:08 ET on Thursday (00:08 BST on Friday).

Move aside, Alexa! 'World's most sophisticated' AI assistant launches on £399 games

EXCLUSIVE: The new TRDR Pocket 'Series 2' from Go Games comes with one of three built-in AI 'personalities' - Scarlet, Tony and Julia - which users can chat to while they're playing. These AIs are surprisingly advanced - allowing users to have much more natural conversations than they would with rival voice assistants like Siri and Alexa.

Ahead of its reported release next month, MailOnline rounds up all the rumoured features the new iPhone 14 series may present. These include a new purple colour and a higher resolution camera.

Scientists claim climate change, seismic activity and ocean circulation could all be to blame. As could the pull of the moon and the 'Chandler Wobble' - a change in the spin of the Earth on its axis.

Bonobos cry just like babies! Video reveals how adult apes produce high-pitched screeches when they are attacked to increase their chances of being comforted by others

The study by psychologists at Durham University reveals that bonobos' displays of distress are strategic, increasing their chances of receiving consolation from bonobo bystanders. They resemble those typically used by infants - such as pouting, whimpering and showing tantrums.

New York City officials issued an air quality alert Thursday that will last until 11pm due to pollution being way above what the World Health Organization deems as safe for all residents.

Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin launches six people into suborbital space: Mission brought the first people of Portuguese and Egyptian descent and helped the first woman complete the Explorer's Extreme Trifecta

Vanessa O'Brien, 57, is the first woman to complete the Explorer's Extreme Trifecta. She finished the the honor when she launched on Blue Origin's rocket to space. O'Brien had previously climbed to the highest point on Earth (Mount Everest) and reached the deepest point in the sea (the Challenger Deep). She was one of six people who soared 62 miles above the surface aboard Blue Origin's New Shepherd rocket. Sara Sabry (second from left) is the first person from Egypt to go to space and and Mário Ferreira (third from left) made history for being the first person from Portugal. Also along for the epic journey was Clint Kelly III (left), a former member of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Steve Young (second from right) who is the former owner of Florida's largest communications firm and YouTube star Coby Cotton (third from right). The New Shepard rocket took off a 9:57am ET from the company's West Texas facility.

Led by Northwestern University and Radboud University in the Netherlands, the team said this flash was one of the most energetic short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever observed.

Caribbean shores choked by record amount of seaweed that's killing wildlife and cutting

Forget sea monsters and tidal waves. Beachgoers and fishermen alike are having their summers ruined by something far less cinematic: record amounts of 'sargassum' seaweed that have inundated huge swaths of Atlantic Ocean shoreline. The amount of algae found in the tropical, central west and east Atlantic - as well as the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico - was up to 24.2 million tons in June. That's an increase from 18.8 million tons a month prior and a record high. 'If you put all this biomass side by side, the entire area is equivalent to six times of Tampa Bay,' Chuanmin Hu, a researcher from the University of South Florida who studied the phenomenon, told DailyMail.com.

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REVEALED: The satellite images that show how triple-digit temperatures blanketed the US in July, putting 150 MILLION Americans under extreme heat warnings and killing dozens 

The tremendous impact of extreme heat - the deadliest weather phenomenon in America that put 150 million under warnings - is revealed in new animated maps from NASA that show how triple-digit weather spread nationwide in July. Temperatures topped 90 and 100 degrees regularly, with Newark seeing a record-breaking five consecutive days of triple digit heat for the first time ever and states including Texas and Oklahoma seeing spikes up to 115 degrees. Utah residents sweltered during a 16-day streak of temperatures over 100 degrees. Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that extreme heat is the deadliest weather phenomenon in the country, killing more people each year than tornadoes, hurricanes or floods.

How a war between China and Taiwan could cause product shortages

China and Taiwan are on the brink of war following a long-standing dispute over the island's sovereignty - which could have massive implications for the consumer technology industry. Experts have told MailOnline that a war between China and Taiwan could cause shortages of highly sought-consumer products leading up until Christmas, including Apple's iPhone and Sony's PlayStation 5.

The Florida Museum has produced a handy interactive map that lets you explore the number of unprovoked shark attacks around the world.

Meet the virtual influencer with MILLIONS of followers: Digital popstar Polar draws in huge crowds of teens as she performs in the Avakin Life metaverse - but parents warn the platform is 'hypersexualised'

EXCLUSIVE: MailOnline spoke to Polar, a digital popstar with over two million of followers, who regularly performs to crowds of teens in the Avakin Life metaverse. Polar says she sees the metaverse as an opportunity to meet with her fans 'on the same side of the screen'. However, many parents have expressed concerns about the safety of their children in the metaverse with one calling Avakin Life 'hypersexualised and cringey.'

James Webb Space Telescope captures its first image of the most distant known star in the

Named Earendel, after a character in J.R.R. Tolkien's 'Lord of the Rings' prequel 'The Silmarillion', the star is almost 28 billion light-years away from Earth. That is more than 10 billion light-years more distant than the next-furthest star astronomers have seen. At such enormous distances, experts can usually only make out entire galaxies, but a lucky coincidence allowed them to spot Earendel with the Hubble Space Telescope and then observe it again with James Webb on July 30.

James Webb telescope captures stunning new image of Cartwheel Galaxy

The US space agency's new telescope has peered into the chaos of the Cartwheel Galaxy (pictured), revealing new details about star formation and the galaxy's central black hole. Its powerful infrared gaze produced a detailed image of the Cartwheel and two smaller companion galaxies against a backdrop of many other galaxies. Located about 500 million light-years away in the Sculptor constellation, the Cartwheel Galaxy is a rare sight.

Giant 16-foot-long metal fragment found in Indonesia believed to be debris from China's out-of-control rocket that fell to Earth Sunday: Officials warn villagers the fragment could be radioactive

A metal fragment has been uncovered outside an Indonesian village that officials say could be part of China's rocket that plummeted to Earth on Sunday. The metal measures 16 feet long and seven feet wide, and appears to be light weight as a video shows a single man able to pick it up off the ground. Jonathan McDowell, an astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told DailyMail.com: 'This is one of the domed ends of the propellant tanks. No doubt in my mind that this is part of the Chinese rocket stage. Also, it was found exactly on the reentry path, which adds credibility.'

BMW is urging owners of its new EV models to stop driving them and not park them in a garage. Those impact were manufactured with defective Samsung-made batteries that could catch fire.

From Boris Johnson to Rita Ora: The famous faces who were born in surprising places REVEALED - as interactive map shows the most notable figures in YOUR area

A new interactive map from Mapbox reveals the most notable people from different towns around the world - with many viewers shocked at the results. Here, MailOnline reveals some of the famous faces who were born in surprising places, including Mel Gibson, Freddie Mercury and Nicole Kidman.

Researchers from Sweden and Switzerland have found that levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in rain have not decreased over the past 20 years, despite our knowledge of their toxicity.

Humans settled in North America 17,000 years EARLIER than previously believed, study finds

A three-foot-tall pile of mammoth bones was uncovered in New Mexico. The bones, which belonged to an adult female and her calf, showed slaughter marks and fractures from blunt force impact. Scientists extracted collagen from the bones, allowing them to date the settlement between 36,250 to 38,900 years old.

Amazing spike maps that will change the way you see Earth

Eye-opening population density spike maps have revealed the true scale of how jam-packed America's coastal areas are compared to its interior - and the staggering detail that New York City's five boroughs could hold all the people on Earth standing shoulder-to-shoulder. Standard population density maps are colored but flat, so it's difficult to know how dense one area truly is in comparison with another. While the spread of humanity may not be surprising, these maps break down population density into spikes -  the higher the spike, the larger the volume of people living in one area -  that offer a fascinating visual appraisal of how humans congregate along the coasts near water in North and South America, Europe, Asia and Australia, due to a longstanding preference since humans evolved from ocean organisms. In the US, we can see the mega-regions along the northeast corridor and the West Coast that account for a large chunk of the country's population. The maps' creator Alasdair Rae, a professor of urban studies and planning at the University of Sheffield, told DailyMail.com: 'In a way these graphics are blindingly obvious, they tell us what we know, but it's a slightly different way of seeing the world. It's interesting and it's also quite enjoyable - part science, part fun and part art.'

Experts at the Bulgarian Museum of Natural History say that unlike today's iconic black and white bear, the European panda wouldn't have eaten much bamboo because its teeth were not strong enough.

The 'ghost ships' are powered by AI and are smaller than traditional warships. This is because they do not need human life-support systems. The Navy is set to add 150 to its fleet by 2045.

The geomagnetic storm is due to a coronal hole in the southwest region of the sun's face that is spewing out 'gaseous material.' This is a G-1 storm will bring auroras to Alaska and Canada.

Who's the most notable person from YOUR hometown? Interactive map reveals the most significant people around the world - with Sean Connery topping the list in Edinburgh, Barack Obama in Honolulu, and Freddie Mercury in Zanzibar

An incredible interactive map has been developed this week that reveals the birthplaces of the most 'notable people' around the world. It suggests that Sean Connery is the most notable person to hail from Edinburgh, while Barack Obama tops the list in Honolulu, and Freddie Mercury in Zanzibar.

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Apple is rumoured to be delaying the launch of new iPad operating system by a month after setbacks with the 'Stage Manager' feature, that will allow users to easily flick between open apps.

Elon Musk is planning to build an airport for himself and top executives at his companies outside of Austin. Conceptual plans have been confirmed for the private airport, sources told Austonia .

In a new report, the Seattle tech giant has revealed it emitted 71.54 million metric tons of carbon-dioxide equivalent last year.

Researchers from Dalhousie University in Canada recorded 114 incidents in 23 countries from April 2020 to December 2021, with a significant majority of encounters involving birds.

The smart necklace includes a sensor that sits on the back of the neck to capture glucose and serotonin levels of the wearer.

Considered 'lost' until recently, the prototype was hand-soldered by Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak in 1976, the year the company was established in Los Altos, California.

The self-driving Apollo RT6 has a detachable steering wheel to allow passengers more space. Chinese tech company Baidu claims its driving capability is the equivalent of a driver with 20 years experience.

Scientists have observed a new hydrothermal field 8,366 feet beneath the Pacific Ocean that could help them better understand how volcanic activity has impacted life in Earth's oceans.

SpaceX is due to break its own record for the most rocket launches in a calendar year on Thursday with its 32nd launch. A Falcon 9 will send another batch of Starlink satellites into low Earth orbit.

Freezing point in the Swiss Alps has climbed to a new high and broken a 27-year-old record, meteorologists have revealed, as record heatwaves continue to rage across Europe.

Researchers from Reichman University have revealed how online flirtations can make your current partner less appealing in the real world.

Astronomer Scott Sheppard, from the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington DC, says the discoveries of near-Earth objects (NEOs) are only just beginning.

The Hoopsy test is designed to be cut in half after its used, with the part that the user wees on thrown in the bin while the rest can go into paper recycling.

Philadelphia-based leaker Evan Blass has posted a Samsung promo image, which shows a blurred outline of a new foldable phone and the text 'Aug 10.2022'.

The additional charge to share your account will initially be tested in five Latin America countries before Netflix decides whether to trial the feature in further countries.

Dr Tracy Fanara, a research scientist and environmental engineer told DailyMail.com that not only is climate change a factor, but so is La Niña contributing to this year's shark migration.

A 48-year-old patient in New York City who is unable to move and speak due to ALS received a permanent brain implant that could allow him to communicate telepathically.

Qualcomm's chips are designed to efficiently transfer heat and included a mode that only activates features being used. This allows others to lay dormant and reserve battery life.

Tesla is expanding its already-massive Gigafactory Texas as the company marks 2 million cars produced at its Nevada and Fremont factories.

The plants require a cool climate at high altitude but due to increasing global temperatures, species are moving to higher ground with drooping saxifrage now found 50 metres from the top of Ben Lawers.

EXCLUSIVE: Vets from the PDSA are urging dog owners to rub at least two layers of pet-friendly sun cream into any exposed skin on their furry friend.

The Roswell event started with a flying saucer in military possession to it being nothing more than a weather balloon, and a UFO expert says the '180 narrative flip' was effective in 'killing the story.'

In a study of over 250 fossilised specimens of Stanleycaris, researchers from the University of Toronto found the brain and nervous system were still preserved in 84 of the fossils.

SpaceX is expanding its Starlink internet service to oceans, rivers and lakes - at a high cost. There's a one-time fee of $10,000 plus $5,000 per month.

Researchers from Alfred Wegener Institute have spotted hundreds of Southern fin whales feeding together near Antarctica's Elephant Island.

Experts say an area 1,539 square miles (3,988 square km) - five times the size of New York City - was deforested in Brazilian Amazon from January to June this year.

The gold ring is said to have been made during the Late Iron Age, which was a period between 400AD and 800AD, and worn by a man based on the band size.

Extraterrestrial life could send messages through space using quantum communication as the photons are unlikely to meet obstacles, according to physicists from the University of Edinburgh.

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature said migrating monarch butterflies have moved closer to extinction in the past decade - prompting scientists to officially designate them as "endangered" (Nic Coury/AP/PA)

The news could spell trouble to North America's agriculture business, as monarch butterflies are major pollinators and contributor to the growth of our food.

A diver looks at decorated gravestone near the Mortar wreck (Bournemouth University/PA)

First discovered in the waters of Poole Bay in 2020, the Medieval shipwreck is known as the 'Mortar Wreck' because it was found carrying mortar bowls used for grinding grain into flour.

Researchers from Lanzhou University studied 21 glaciers on the Tibetan Plateau and found evidence of 968 microbes, most of which have never been seen before.

EXCLUSIVE: Data shows that London has more chargers than all of England's counties combined, despite the latter being home to almost half of the country's population.

Fossils in China's Yunnan Province show that yunnanozoan is the oldest-known stem vertebrate - a vertebrate that's extinct but related to living vertebrates.

The US space agency's observatory was launched to look back in time to the dawn of the universe and to capture what happened just a couple of hundred million years after the Big Bang.

The Rosetta Stone will be featured in a new exhibition of ancient artefacts at The British Museum in London. This is despite calls from Egypt for its return to its country of origin.

An open letter signed by 135 Amazon workers in the UK pleads with the company to 'bin unfair targets' and end the 'constant surveillance'.

President Joe Biden shared the first image from NASA's James Webb Telescope - the deepest and sharpest infrared picture of the distant universe to date.

A study suggests dolphins are fond of classical music. Dolphins played Bach, Grieg, Saint-Saens, Debussy and Beethoven showed more sociable behaviour.

NASA's James Webb Telescope will target multiple cosmic objects - including stellar nurseries, a giant planet and a galaxy group that's 290-million light-years away.

Scientists have unearthed a unique trove of artifacts from the Norwegian mountains that includes a preserved arrow shaft, a mummified bird and a Bronze age shoe.

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